Thursday, May 6, 2010

How to Use a Thermal Scope

A thermal scope is an ocular device that can be held, strapped to a helmet, environmental protection mask, fire arm or many other devices. A thermal scope allows the user to see in darkness, smoke, rain or fog. Its design purpose was for military forces to use during night operations but there are also many civilian applications as well.

Unlike image enhancement (the green light night vision devices), they do not rely on any light sources. A thermal imager gathers the infrared energy that is emitted by objects and then produces the image. The quality is much clearer than image enhancement technology. They scopes can be cooled or uncooled. The uncooled variety is the most common. They can be operated at ambient temperatures and are more portable. The uncooled thermal scopes rely on a cryocooler to mute any thermal noise created from the scope. The result is a much crisper image with incredible detail. This type of technology is quite expensive and the higher resolution models are not currently available for sale. Property owners are starting to utilize this technology for many reasons. As a security option, it adds an extra layer of protection to camera monitoring systems. Some models can see farther than 20 miles and since they do not emit any light, they are nearly impossible to detect. It can easily see into the darkest corners or spot intruders hiding in debris or foliage. Many homeowners concerned about their heating or air conditioning bills hire energy auditors who use them to locate the cracks where the air is escaping. They can also be used to spot any effluents leaks from the structure or even condensation spots to aid in mold eradication.

They can be found at all levels of society. They are commonly used in search and rescue operations. Firefighters can benefit from the use of a thermal scope in situations where rooms are filled with smoke. There are many useful purposes for them in medical research as well. Some airports have started adding thermal technology to their security systems to screen passengers for high body temperatures which could be a sign of a contagious virus such as the H1N1. Archeologists use thermal scopes in aerial searches for ruins and even paranormal investigators are using them these days. As thermal scope technology continues to improve, we will start see even more exciting applications.


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